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't been tested against what hezbollah has been which is a much different store ji. >> that's certainly true. hamas fired i believe 4,000 rockets from gaza in a month. if this really does end in a fight with hezbollah in lebanon, hezbollah allegedly has at least 50,000 rockets, much better rockets, too. >> and iron dome could not handle 50,000? >> no way. no. it will help. i think there are 5 iron dome systems in place active at the moment. their goal is to create 13 iron dome systems. it will help a lot. but hundreds of rockets fired a day. it apt going to do that much. >> does this set back peace though in an odd way? if you can build fortresses for israel, then what is the incentive to do a two state solution? >> one of the issues of iron dome, one of the reasons that part of the military was against the iron dome is it was considered to be a defensive weapon. and israel, the military crowd is an offensive army. so they said we're spending money in the wrong place. we shouldn't be worried about defending. we should be worried about winning by creating attacking weapons. so the releva
and conventional weapons. you have refugee problems on the turkish border. the al qaeda/hezbollah action in syria is very, very concerning to recognize terrorist organizations. this is real trouble real quick. if you want a diplomatic solution -- and i still think there's one possible -- you can't do it if you have no credibility with the opposition and no credibility with our arab league partners. and right now we find ourselves in that spot. so you have to build that credibility. this is not boots on the ground, by the way. i want to make that very clear, we don't need 101st airborne division showing up. >> when you said boots on the groupd, am i wrong? i thought you said over the weekend that you joined in with senator mccain and senator levin, and you want some kind of special forces to go in with syria to identify, locate, or somehow get the chemical weapons back. hence i call that boots on the ground. >> i think it's really important to be clear about what we're trying to do here. we have small groups, special capability forces that we can add to the mix here that does t doesn't -- is not
muslim brotherhood-led government and hezbollah having a big role the israelis fearful of what's going on there. move to syria, we all know what's happening there in the last 24 hours reports maybe chemical weapons used, reports that haven't been verified by u.s. intelligence. you keep moving down the road through jordan and iraq and iran. i think the president wanted to coordinate strategy with the prime minister of israel benjamin netanyahu. he's just formed a brand new government. they both have to work together over the next four years. and i think president obama wanted to make sure that both of these governments were on the same page on these really sensitive issues. >> you mentioned syria, wolf, and the accusations flying back and forth about chemical weapons. the obama administration has said in the past this would be a game changer that is a red line. as we were discussing earlier with iran watson, tens of thousands of people have been readily killed by conventional weapons, why would this make it different? >> i think the great fear that the u.s. has, that the obama administr
with respect to israel's growing challenges on its borders, particularly in lebanon with hezbollah in the south with gaza and egypt and, of course, with syria. the last thing that the united states wants is for netanyahu and the israeli people the belief that the president does not have his back and they would have to act unilaterally without due american consultation with israelis. >> and we know, michael, that the president is going to be going to ramallah to be talking to president mahmoud abbas. talked to one palestinian legislator who laid out conditions for returning to the negotiating table. either israel puts a six month freeze on the building in the west bank and they don't pursue international criminal court, or they come to some agreement on borders along the pre-1967 lines. do you see in any of this any hope for progress? >> well, unfortunately, not much, chris. i don't think that israel or frankly the united states are going to go along with those preconditions. and i think the only way negotiations are going to get restarted is if they're unconditional. and you know, one thing we
families. that's why every country that values justice should call hezbollah what it truly is, a terrorist organization. because the world cannot tolerate an organization that murders innocent civilians, stockpiles rockets to shoot its cities, and supports the massacre of men, women, and children in syria right now. the fact that hezbollah has allied the assad regime has stockpiles of chemical weapons only heightens the urgency. we will continue to cooperate closely to guard against that danger. i've made it clear to bashar al assad and all who follow his orders, we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching. we will hold you accountable. the syrian people have the right to be freed from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill his own people than relinquish power. assad must go, so that syria's future can begin. because true stability in syria depends upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders, while making peace
and the opposition. it is a regional war by proxy. you have rapp and iraq and hezbollah supporting him. on the other hand you have turkey and qatar. not only a regional war by proxy. you have russia and the united states. i would argue that president barack obama has been reluctant to intervene directly by either providing arms to the opposition or sending american boots on the ground. what i like to see is a concerted effort on the part of the united states, leading the effort to really broker a political settlement, a diplomatic solution. there is no military solution in syria. syria is not libya. even though i would argue that the rebels will ultimately win there particular struggle in the long term, we don't know. one or two years. at the end of it, there will be no syria as we know it. there will be no state as we know it. and more important from my point of view, there will be the social fabric, the diversity would most likely be destroyed. not to mention the that i willover effects from syria into will he be none and jordan into iraq and even into turkey. >> wow! a dramatic scene that you pai
from outside from iran on -- and hezbollah on one side and from saudi arabia, qatar and other states on the other. if there's any hope of diffusing the conflict, one way is going to have to deal with the issues of iranian support. iran is deeply concerned because syria is the major foothold in the arab world. there's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their peo
this yesterday. does syria's arsenal and weapons get in the hands of not just the opposition but hezbollah, hamas, other jihadist groups in this region? the word security takes on many different shapes, many different wrinkles. when you're meeting with the palestinian president it's normally about negotiations and security cooperations with israel. because of everything going on in this part of the world, it's a lot more complicated. and syria, including worries about the use of chemical weapons, you bet that would be a fkter as well. >> we're looking at live pictures of president obama and mahmoud abbas. we saw the president shaking hands and reviewing the palestinian troops. >> similarities from yesterday, this is a red carpet reception, pomp and circumstance as well but protest that is will be greeting him as he lands there and goes through the region. >> jessica yellin is in ramallah, covering this trip. you've been talking to the white house for days now about this what is it that the white house wants to achieve with president ab abbas today? >> reporter: hi, john. hi, zoraida. they're hope
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8